The Volcano in Southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull Glacier

An enormous ash cloud from a remote Icelandic volcano caused the biggest flight disruption since 9/11 Thursday as it drifted over northern Europe and stranded travelers on six continents. Officials said it could take days for the skies to become safe again in one of aviation's most congested areas. READ THE STORY

1 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

This aerial image shows the crater spewing ash and plumes of grit at the summit of the volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. A lingering volcanic ash plume forced extended no-fly restrictions over much of Europe Saturday, as Icelandic scientists warned that volcanic activity had increased and showed no sign of abating _ a portent of more travel chaos to come. Although the ash plume has grown, a northerly wind was expected to allow enough visibility for scientists to fly over the volcano Saturday.

2 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

The sun set over Epsom Down in south west London. Britain's airports continue their closure as flights across UK have been grounded for the third day due to the volcanic ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajoekull Glacier drifting across Europe, posing a potential threat to aircraft.

3 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

A view of a deserted airside departure lounge at Terminal 5 at Heathrow Airport London. The airport was closed due to a cloud of volcanic ash in the upper atmosphere above much of Europe, emanating from a volcanic eruption near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcanic ash is a hazard to jet aircraft engines, causing the cancellation of many flights over European airspace.

4 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

Einzia Gieras, left, and Elena Albe, both from Rome, Italy wait at Logan Airport in Boston, where many outgoing flights were canceled as a result of a lingering volcanic ash plume which forced extended no-fly restrictions over much of Europe.

5 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

German Red Cross helpers talk to stranded passengers getting ready for their unexpected overnight stay in the terminals at Munich Airport in Munich, Germany. Munich Franz Josef Strauss Airport was closed due to the cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland moving across Northern Europe and will remain closed for an undetermined period.

6 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

A car is seen driving through the ash from the volcano eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcano erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air. Flights around the world have been canceled and passengers stranded as the ash cloud from the volcano affected operations at some of the world's busiest airports.

7 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday April 14, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.

8 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard, taken, Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

9 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by NEODASS/University of Dundee shows the volcanic ash plume from Iceland, top left, to the north of Britain at received by NASA's Terra Satellite at 11.39 GMT Thursday April 15, 2010.

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In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland.

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A man looks at a broken section of Iceland's main coastal ring road near Reykjavik Wednesday April 14 2010, after melt water from a volcanic eruption caused river levels to rise by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the Eyjafjallajokull glacier and Iceland's main coastal ring road was closed near the volcano. Workers smashed holes in the highway in three spots in a bid to give the rushing water a clear route to the coast and prevent bridges from being swept away. Scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month.

12 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, early Thursday April 15, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.

13 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard, taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, floodwaters rising after the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

14 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

15 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

16 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

17 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

This picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows tourists gathered to watch lava spurt out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption.

18 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

This picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows tourists gathered to watch lava spurt out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption.

19 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

his picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows lava spurting out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption.

20 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

This picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows lava spurting out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption.

21 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

This picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows lava spurting out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption.

22 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

Ice chunks carried downstream by floodwaters caused by volcanic activity lie on the Markarfljot river bank, some 120km east of the capital Rejkavik, Iceland. The Eyjafjallajokull glacier volcano began erupting for the second time in a month on Wednesday, sending ash several miles (kilometers) into the air. Winds pushed the plume south and east across Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and into the heart of Europe causing travel chaos.

23 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air just prior to sunset. Thick drifts of volcanic ash blanketed parts of rural Iceland on Friday as a vast, invisible plume of grit drifted over Europe, emptying the skies of planes and sending hundreds of thousands in search of hotel rooms, train tickets or rental cars.

24 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

A man flies his model aeroplane during a sunset at Epsom Down in south west London. Britain's airports continue their closure as flights across the UK have been grounded for the third day due to the volcanic ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajoekull Glacier drifting across Europe, posing a potential threat to aircraft.

SOURCE:
http://blogs.tampabay.com/photo/2010/04/iceland-volcano.html



How Volcanic Ash Can Kill An Airplane!


plane1 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

As volcanic ash spreads from an eruption under a glacier in the Eyjafjallajokull region of Iceland, the British have taken the drastic step of locking down the country's airspace. Here's why.

The world's bustling air traffic corridors pass over hundreds of volcanoes just like the one in Iceland — all of which are capable of sudden, explosive eruptions of fire and ash. In the United States alone, aircraft carry many thousands of passengers and millions of dollars of cargo over volcanoes each day. As we see today, volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even thousands of miles from an eruption. Airborne ash can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and most importantly, cause jet engines to fail.

In fact, according to Boeing public relations officials, in the past 30 years, more than 90 jet-powered commercial airplanes have encountered clouds of volcanic ash and suffered damage as a result.

Here's an example of one such case.

The Story of KLM Flight 867

On December 15, 1989, clouds of ash from an eruption at Mt. Redoubt Volcano in Alaska nearly caused a Boeing 747 jetliner (KLM Flight 867) carrying 231 passengers to crash land after losing power to all four engines.

As the crew of KLM Flight 867 struggled to restart the plane's engines, "smoke" and a strong odor of sulfur filled the cockpit and cabin. For five long minutes the powerless 747 jetliner, bound for Anchorage, Alaska, with 231 terrified passengers aboard, fell in silence toward the rugged, snow-covered Talkeetna Mountains (7,000 to 11,000 feet high). All four engines had flamed out when the aircraft inadvertently entered a cloud of ash blown from erupting Redoubt Volcano, 150 miles away. The volcano had begun erupting 10 hours earlier on that morning of December 15, 1989. Only after the crippled jet had dropped from an altitude of 27,900 feet to 13,300 feet (a fall of more than 2 miles) was the crew able to restart all engines and land the plane safely at Anchorage. The plane required $80 million in repairs, including the replacement of all four damaged engines.

plane2 - the volcano in southern iceland's eyjafjallajokull glacier

How did it happen?

It's a process that's sort of like Mother Nature's version of a "Cash for Clunkers" engine getting killed. Volcanic ash normally contains glassy materials, such as silicates, whose melting points are 600 degrees Celsius to 800 degrees Celsius. Since internal temperature of in-flight jet engine exceed 1000 degrees Celsius, glassy particles in volcanic ash inhaled by the engines instantly melt. In the course of exhaust, the glassy materials are rapidly cooled down in the turbine chamber, stick on the turbine vanes, and disturb the flow of high-pressure combustion gases. This disorder of the flow may stop the entire engine in serious cases — such as KLM Flight 867.

Such dangerous and costly encounters between aircraft and volcanic ash can happen because ash clouds are difficult to distinguish from ordinary clouds, both visually and on radar. Also, ash clouds can drift great distances from their source. For example, in less than 3 days, the ash cloud from the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines traveled more than 5,000 miles to the east coast of Africa. This ash cloud damaged more than 20 aircraft — including the DC-10 shown above — most of which were flying more than 600 miles from the volcano.

SOURCE:
http://jalopnik.com/5517775/how-volcanic-ash-can-kill-an-airplane?skyline=true&s=i

  • Math
  • April 19, 2010, 3:56 am
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Comments

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  • 3

    I want to get one of those remote control planes and fly it outside heathrow, just to be a dick

    • Dannyl
    • April 19, 2010, 5:31 am
    Reply
  • 2

    Where? Also there is a capital I in Icelandic!

    • Math
    • April 19, 2010, 11:06 am
    Reply
  • 2

    It just chundered EVERYWHERE! like a little vomcano

    Reply
  • 1

    ahaha

    Reply
  • 1

    Just imagine everyone waiting in terminal 5 then all of a sudden they see a plane in the distance! Hopes are all raised only for it to remain over in the distance, hopes all dashed!

    That would be funny!

    • Math
    • April 19, 2010, 8:16 am
    Reply
  • 1

    I saw the Air Crash Investigation for the KLM flight, pretty interesting stuff. Been weird not hearing the planes or seeing the plane trails for the past few days though. Good post +3

    • SuDoku
    • April 19, 2010, 8:18 am
    Reply
  • 1

    @SuDoku - Yeah it has been weird, I looked up a few times whilst sat outside the pub on Saturday and there wasn't a cloud, vapour trail or plane in the sky just a mass blue void!
    We won't see that again in a hurry!

    • Math
    • April 19, 2010, 8:22 am
    Reply
  • 1

    What the blue void or the planes? Because it could be a while before we see either again! lol

    • SuDoku
    • April 19, 2010, 8:26 am
    Reply
  • 1

    Yep both we've had our summer on Saturday! Nothing but rain and grey skies to come.

    • Math
    • April 19, 2010, 8:53 am
    Reply
  • 1

    icelandic spelling fail

    Reply
  • 1

    "I hate Iceland! I HATE ICELAND!!!"

    • Ertrov
    • April 19, 2010, 3:14 pm
    Reply
  • 1

    soome yellowstone is gunna blow and then were all fucked i hate living in idaho far enough to not get kill right off and close enouhgt that ill be sure to die within 24 hours

    Reply
  • 1

    the good new tho is now if the airport needed to upgrade any computer systems they can now do it without a worry :)

    • gw2250
    • April 19, 2010, 8:59 pm
    Reply
  • 1

    the bad news is they're losing 200 million a day haha

    Reply
  • 1

    and now the very bad news they will make it back by charging more for your ticket and your luggage

    • gw2250
    • April 19, 2010, 9:28 pm
    Reply
  • 1

    so you guys cant see the ash cloud i gather?

    Reply
  • 1

    Only a sunset/sunrise. It's goes a really deep orange/red. Well more so than usual.

    • Math
    • April 19, 2010, 11:51 pm
    Reply
  • 1

    well you try and spell the name of that volcano without looking

    Reply
  • 1

    Chunder! Not heard that in a while!

    • Math
    • April 21, 2010, 1:08 am
    Reply
  • 1

    ahah fuckin love 'Gap Yah'. "Have that nature! 1-nil, made my own little vomcanoe" :P

    Reply
  • 1

    Reply
  • 1

    I've been trying to link like that for ages even did it successfully one night while pissed up but forgot how I did it!
    How please good sir? Is it the good old hyperlink":"***** ?

    • Math
    • June 4, 2010, 2:32 pm
    Reply
  • 1

    to do a hyperlink... [ url = http://link-location-here.com/blah] Text you want to appear [/ url]
    Remember to remove the spaces.
    So, [ur l=http://www.sharenator.com/]Awesome Site![/u rl] makes Awesome Site!

    Reply
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