How Japanese Kids Learn To Multiply

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  • 2

    Holy cow monkey cube of rubix 12x12. I can do math in my head a lot faster than you could write that out and add.

    152 x 81

    100 x 81 + 10 x 81 x 5 + 81 x 2 = 12,312

    100 x 81 = 8100
    10 x 81 = 810 x 5 = 4050 (8 x 5 = 40 which 4000. 10 x 5 = 50)
    81 x 2 = 162
    add
    12,312

    This is pretty much exactly what they do- break the multiplication up into components. They just do it visually.
    - Logos385 June 18, 2013, 11:13 am
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  • 1

    what the fuck is this? I dont get it sorry

    • Vans
    • January 29, 2013, 5:40 pm
    oh wait while thinking a bit more about this is it that you multiply the lines that touch in each circle? Something like that?
    - Vans January 29, 2013, 5:42 pm
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  • 1

    I got it! The red line is based off the number 1. The blue line is based off the number 3. To get the next part, take the total amount of all the lines that connect to the black lines, including the black lines. This equals 6 in this case. Then, take the total amount of all the lines that connect with the green line, including the green line. This equals 5 in this case. The red line gives you the final number.

    Reply
  • 1

    *holds fingers up* come at me math

    Reply
  • 1

    Dude, elaborate.
    What the cheese.

    Reply
  • 1

    This is pretty cool. For those confused, it is just a visual way of doing traditional "long multiplication" taught to young students.
    Steps-
    1. Write the first number as horizontal lines, separating each digit by a bit of space. See the first picture, "13" is horizontal, one line, space, 3 lines.
    2. Write the second number in the same way, but vertically.
    3. Count the intersections in each diagonal grouping (see the ovals). This represent the digit that goes in each tenths place, with the top left being the largest digit, and the bottom right being smallest. (See the first pic: there is one intersection in the hundred place-→ 100. There are five in the tens place-→ 50. 6 in the ones place-→ 6.)
    4. Now simply add the # of intersections, translated into sensible numbers as described in the above parentheses: 100+50+6=156. Multiplication done!

    Reply
  • 1

    This post successfully increased my hate for math. (I have dyscalculia)

    • SydG
    • June 18, 2013, 11:52 am
    Why hate me? ;-)
    - Math June 18, 2013, 11:56 am
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